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Films - July 2013

Languages

Arabic

Finnish

Hebrew

Spanish


Cantonese

French

Icelandic

Swedish


Danish

Hungarian

Norwegian

English

German

Silent

 

Arabic

The Attack
Directed by Ziad Doueiri
(Lebanon/France/Qatar/Belgium, 2013, 122 min.)
Israeli-Palestinian surgeon Amin Jaafari's picture-perfect life is turned upside down when a suicide bombing in a restaurant leaves 19 dead and the Israeli police inform him that his wife was responsible. Convinced of her innocence, Amin abandons the relative security of his adopted homeland and enters the Palestinian territories in pursuit of the truth (Arabic and Hebrew).
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Cantonese

A Better Tomorrow
(Moo-jeok-ja)
Directed by John Woo
(Hong Kong, 1986, 95 min.)
A reforming ex-gangster tries to reconcile with his estranged policeman brother, Leslie Cheung, but the ties to his former gang are difficult to break (English and Chinese subtitles).
Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., July 12, 7 p.m.,
Sun., July 14, 2 p.m.

A Chinese Ghost Story
(Sien nui yau wan)
Directed by Ching Siu-tung
(Hong Kong, 1987, 98 min.)
This supernatural fantasy stars Leslie Cheung as a traveling tax collector who, while taking shelter in an abandoned temple, meets and falls in love with a beautiful woman — who happens to be a ghost (English and Chinese subtitles).
Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., July 19, 7 p.m.,
Sun., July 21, 2 p.m.

Viva Erotica
(Se qing nan nu)
Directed by Derek Yee
(Hong Kong, 1996, 99 min.)
A down-on-his-luck filmmaker agrees to direct a soft-core porn flick — but he struggles to maintain both his artistic integrity and his relationship with his girlfriend while he deals with a sleazy producer and a tempestuous starlet who refuses to take off her clothes (English and Chinese subtitles).
Freer Gallery of Art
Fri., July 26, 7 p.m.,
Sun. July 28, 2 p.m.

Danish

A Hijacking
Directed by Tobias Lindholm
(Denmark, 2012, 99 min.)
A cargo ship is hijacked by Somali pirates who try to ransom the men on board, including the ship's genial cook, for millions of dollars, leading to a psychological battle with the shipping company's CEO back in Copenhagen.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Nightwatch
(Nattevagten)
Directed by Ole Bornedal
(Denmark, 1994, 107 min.)
Martin takes a job as a night watchman at the local morgue, where the victims of a serial killer keep piling up. On a dare from his buddy, Martin takes a prank too far and soon finds himself the prime suspect in the case, on the run from both the police and the killer (Danish and Swedish).
AFI Silver Theatre
Wed., July 3, 9:30 p.m.
Wed., July 10, 9:30 p.m.

English

Easy Money
(Snabba Cash)
Directed by Daniel Espinosa
(Sweden, 2010, 124 min.)
Needing funds to partake of the flashy, party-centric lifestyle led by his college chums, "JW" Westlund resorts to drug running for the Serbian mob. For a while, JW maintains this double life but soon his part-time job becomes a full-time problem (English, Swedish, Serbian, Spanish and German).
AFI Silver Theatre
Wed., July 3, 7 p.m.,
Thu., July 11, 7:20 p.m.

The Element of Crime
(Forbrydelsens element)
Directed by Lars von Trier
(Denmark, 1984, 104 min.)
Exiled to Cairo, an ex-cop submits to hypnosis to recall his last case, the "Lotto Murderer," who preyed upon young girls employed as lottery ticket sellers, trying to identify with the mind of the killer in order to anticipate his next move (English and Arabic).
AFI Silver Theatre
Tue., July 9, 9:40 p.m.,
Wed., July 10, 7:20 p.m.

Headhunters
(Hodejegerne)
Directed by Morten Tyldum
(Norway/Germany, 2011, 100 min.)
Aksel Hennie leads a double life as a corporate headhunter who steals and deals artwork on the side, but he's not the only one playing a double game (English, Norwegian, Danish and Russian).
AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., July 27, 1:30 p.m.
Sun., July 28, 9:30 p.m.

The Laughing Policeman
Directed by Stuart Rosenberg
(U.S., 1973, 112 min.)
When Detective Jake Martin's partner is gunned down along with a busload of fellow transit passengers, Martin leads the manhunt for the crazed gunman, alongside an impulsive rookie detective Leo Larsen.
AFI Silver Theatre
July 19 to 23

Mad Max
Directed by George Miller
(Australia, 1979, 93 min.)
In a desolate post-apocalyptic future, Max is a motorcycle cop looking to get out of the game and spend more time with his wife and kid. But after the Glory Riders brutally murder his family, he mounts his souped-up V8 racer and sets off to exact bloody revenge.
AFI Silver Theatre
July 12 to 15

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior
Directed by George Miller
(Australia, 1981, 95 min.)
Mel Gibson is back as Max Rockatansky, who roams the post-apocalyptic Australian Outback where everyone is desperate to lay claim to the most precious resource: gasoline. He stumbles on a ragtag group of squatters who've staked a claim to an oil refinery and is moved to join their ranks in the fight against the rapacious and sadistic warlord, the Humungus.
AFI Silver Theatre
Fri., July 19, 9:45 p.m.,
Sun., July 21, 7:40 p.m.

The Maiden Danced to Death
Directed by Ender Holes
(Hungary/Canada/Slovenia, 2011, 100 min.)
When Istvan defected to the West many years earlier, his brother Gyula took over the dance company that Istvan had created. When Istvan finally returns, the complicated jumble of emotions experienced by the brothers proves devastating as they work together to produce "The Maiden Danced to Death," a folk-themed dance (English and Hungarian).
National Gallery of Art
Fri., July 5, 3 p.m.

No Subtitles Necessary: Vilmos and László
Directed by James Chressanthis
(U.S., 2008, 86 min.)
This documentary chronicles the friendship and interrelated careers of László Kovács and Vilmos Zsigmond, two of Hollywood's most celebrated cinematographers who left Hungary following the 1956 uprising and, on their own, became American legends.
National Gallery of Art
Sat., July 6, 2 p.m.

Not Quite Hollywood: The Wild, Untold Story of Ozploitation!
Directed by Mark Hartley
(Australia/U.S., 2008, 103 min.)
This energetic and irreverent documentary celebrates the Australian genre cinema of the '70s and '80s known as "Ozploitation," featuring outrageous interviews with Quentin Tarantino, Jamie Lee Curtis, Dennis Hopper and Ozploitation filmmakers.
AFI Silver Theatre
July 12 to 18

The Painting
Directed by Jean-François Laguionie
(France, 2011, 78 min.)
In this wryly inventive animated parable, a kingdom is divided into the three castes: the painted Alldunns; the Halfies that were left incomplete by the Painter; and the untouchable Sketchies, simple charcoal outlines — all of whom explore the different worlds depicted in the paintings strewn about them, attempting to discover just what the Painter had in mind for his creations.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Reykjavik-Rotterdam
Directed by Óskar Jónasson
(Iceland/Germany/Netherlands, 2008, 88 min.)
With a wife and two kids, Kristófer has gone straight since his last arrest for smuggling alcohol into high-tariff Iceland on his merchant seaman jobs. But after his wife's brother gets in over his head with local thugs, he's forced to go back to his old ways.
AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., July 20, 6:15 p.m.,
Tue., July 23, 9:15 p.m.

Shadow Dancer
Directed by James Marsh
(U.K./Ireland, 2012, 101 min.)
When a single mother living in Belfast with her hard-line IRA brothers is arrested, an MI5 officer offers her a choice: go to prison or return to Belfast to spy on her own family. With her son's life in danger, she places her trust in the MI5 and returns home.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Still Mine
Directed by Michael McGowan
(Canada, 2012, 103 min.)
In this heartfelt story, an elderly man is blindsided by local building codes and bureaucratic officials when he sets out to build a more suitable house for his ailing wife.
The Avalon Theatre
Opens Fri., July 12

Unfinished Song
Directed by Paul Andrew Williams
(U.K./Germany, 2012, 96 min.)
A curmudgeonly pensioner named Arthur is reluctantly inspired to join a highly unconventional local seniors' choir after the death of his wife, a process that helps him repair relations with his estranged son.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

Wake in Fright
Directed by Ted Kotcheff
(Australia/U.S., 1971, 114 min.)
A British schoolteacher descends into personal demoralization at the hands of drunken, deranged derelicts while stranded in a small town in the Australian Outback.
AFI Silver Theatre
Fri., July 26, 9:30 p.m.,
Mon, July 29, 9:15 p.m.

Finnish

Crime and Punishment
(Rikos ja rangaistus)
Directed by Aki Kaurismäki
(Finland, 1983, 93 min.)
Ex-law student and current slaughterhouse worker Rahikainen murders not a pawnbroker but a wealthy industrialist simply as revenge for a past wrong. Unable to prove the suspect's guilt, an inspector bides his time, convinced that Rahikainen's conscience will eventually lead him to turn himself in.
AFI Silver Theatre
July 13 to 15

French

Augustine
Directed by Alice Winocour
(France, 2012, 102 min.)
Augustine suffers a seizure that leaves her partially paralyzed and is shipped off to an all-female psychiatric hospital specializing "hysteria." There, she captures the attention of a renowned neurologist after she has another attack that appears to give her intense physical pleasure. Intrigued, he begins using her as his principal subject, gaining acclaim but blurring the line between doctor and patient.
Landmark's E Street Cinema

France-Allemagne: Une Histoire Presque Commune
Directed by Bertrand Délais
(France, 2012, 55 min.)
To mark the occasion of the 50th anniversary celebrations of the Elysée Treaty, this retrospective traces the chronology of the friendship between France and Germany from the early 1960s to today via the successful partnerships between the German and French heads of state over the years.
Alliance Française de Washington

German

Hannah Arendt
Directed by Margarethe von Trotta
(Germany/Luxembourg/France, 2012, 109 min.)
Hannah Arendt, the influential German-Jewish political theorist, introduces the concept of the "banality of evil" during her reporting on 1961 trial of ex-Nazi Adolf Eichmann (German, French, English, Hebrew and Latin).
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., July 5

Hebrew

The World is Funny
(Haolam Mats'hik)
Directed by Shemi Zarhin
(Israel, 2012, 127 min.)
Estranged siblings who have endured childhood abandonment face new and ultimately interconnected challenges in adulthood: a widower whose older son has just awakened from a lengthy coma; a radio producer and his terminally ill Russian girlfriend; and a travel agent whose daughter was killed in an army accident.
The Avalon Theatre
Wed., July 24, 8 p.m.

Hungarian

American Postcard
Directed by Gábor Bódy
(Hungary, 1975, 91 min.)
Two Hungarian officers, recent arrivals to America, serving as Union Army surveyors in the Civil War symbolize opposing attitudes toward the conflict: the rationalist, hoping to offer his skills to the cause, and the raw romantic revolutionary (Hungarian, French and German).
National Gallery of Art
Fri., July 5, 1 p.m.

Bánk bán
Directed by Csaba Káel
(Hungary, 2002, 118 min.)
Ferenc Erkel's grand romantic opera "Bánk bán" — a season opener in Budapest's state opera house — transforms a medieval folk saga into a sweeping visual and musical extravaganza.
National Gallery of Art
Sat., July 6, 4 p.m.

Children of Glory
(Szabadság, szerelem)
Directed by Krisztina Goda and Joe Eszterhas
(Hungary, 2006, 123 min.)
A heroic interpretation of events surrounding the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, this epic romance entangled with political intrigue follows the life of a celebrated athlete and an activist whom he meets at a revolutionary rally on the streets of Budapest (Hungarian, Russian and English).
National Gallery of Art
Sun., July 7, 4 p.m.

Icelandic

Jar City
(Mýrin)
Directed by Baltasar Kormákur
(Iceland/Germany/Denmark, 2006, 93 min.)
In 1974, a young girl met an untimely end, her murder never solved. Thirty years later, a photo of her grave is the only clue in the mysterious murder of a crusty old pervert. It falls to Inspector Erlendur to reopen the cold case, whose trail leads to a foreboding medical facility that houses disturbing secrets.
AFI Silver Theatre
July 12 to 17

Norwegian

Insomnia
Directed by Erik Skjoldbjærg
(Norway, 1997, 96 min.)
Troubled homicide detective Jonas Engström is sent to investigate a brutal murder in a small town in the far north of Norway, where the sun never sets, the fog never lifts, and tension runs high as Engström begins to lose his grip first on the case, then on reality (Norwegian and Swedish).
AFI Silver Theatre
Fri., July 12, 7 p.m.,
Tue., July 16, 9:15 p.m.

Silent

Blackmail
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.K., 1929, 85 min.)
A woman kills in self-defense and is subsequently bedeviled by both her terrifying memories and a merciless blackmailer (live musical accompaniment by the Mont Alto Picture Orchestra).
AFI Silver Theatre
Fri., July 26, 7:30 p.m.

Champagne
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.K., 1928, 106 min.)
A millionaire feigns bankruptcy to teach his frivolous flapper daughter a lesson in Hitchcock's effervescent jazz-age romantic comedy (live musical accompaniment by Ray Brubacher).
AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., July 20, 4 p.m.

The Constant Nymph
Directed by Adrian Brunel
(U.K., 1928, 110 min.)
When a young woman moves in with her cousin and her husband, their marriage begins to falter in this shocking mix of adolescent desire and illicit entanglement — set in a spectacularly bright Austrian state of Tyrol and later in the dark drawing rooms of London (Philip Carli in performance).
National Gallery of Art
Sun., July 21, 5:30 p.m.

Downhill
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.K., 1927, 74 min.)
A boy wrongly charged with stealing is expelled from his school and makes his way to Paris, where he really starts to go "downhill" (Philip Carli in performance).
National Gallery of Art
Sun., July 21, 4 p.m.

Easy Virtue
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.K., 1927, 90 min.)
Larita Filton flees England after a scandalous divorce, marries a new man, and then attempts to re-enter British society with her suitably rich new mate while battling society's conventions (screens with "The First Born"; Stephen Horne in performance).
National Gallery of Art
Sun., July 14, 4 p.m.

The First Born
Directed by Miles Mander
(U.K., 1928, 88 min.)
Reflecting on the double standards of upper-crust British society, "The First Born" tracks the deterioration of adoring bonds between Sir Hugo Boycott and his young bride after she fails to produce an heir (screens with "Easy Virtue"; Stephen Horne in performance).
National Gallery of Art
Sun., July 14, 4 p.m.

The Lodger
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.K., 1926, 98 min.)
Hitchcock's first true thriller and earliest commercial success (and containing the first of his cameo appearances), "The Lodger" tells the story of a boarding house resident suspected of murder by his landlady (Monto Alto Picture Orchestra in performance).
National Gallery of Art
Sat., July 27, 2 p.m.

The Manxman
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.S., 1929, 110 min.)
A love triangle between two childhood friends and the girl they both love plays out against the rugged coastline of the Isle of Man and the puritanical social codes of an isolated fishing village in one of Hitchcock's most accomplished silent films.
AFI Silver Theatre
Sat., July 13, 5:30 p.m.

The Ring
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
(U.K., 1927, 108 min.)
Jack "One Round" Sander is a promising contender hoping for a shot at the big time, his success in the boxing ring ultimately in service to the lovely Mabel. But his promoter, who also has eyes for Mabel, would prefer that his boxer focus only on the sport (live musical accompaniment by the Mont Alto Picture Orchestra).
AFI Silver Theatre
Sun., July 28, 3 p.m.

Spanish

I'm So Excited!
Directed by Pedro Almodóvar
(Spain, 2013, 90 min.)
A technical failure during a flight to Mexico City endangers passengers and crew — whose defenselessness in the face of danger provokes a general catharsis.
Landmark's E Street Cinema
Opens Fri., July 5

Swedish

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
(Män som hatar kvinnor)
Directed by Niels Arden Oplev
(Sweden/Denmark/Germany, 2009, 152 min.)
Disgraced journalist Mikael Blomkvist teams up with genius hacker Lisbeth Salander to investigate a cold case involving a missing girl, and together they uncover a horrific scandal that reaches to the very top of the Swedish business elite.
AFI Silver Theatre
July 27 to 31

The Hunters
(Jägarna)
Directed by Kjell Sundvall
(Sweden, 1996, 113 min.)
Returning to his hometown after the death of his father and a case of career burnout, Erik Bäckström reconnects with his brother and old chums. But after investigating the slaughter of the local Samis' reindeer herd, Erik uncovers a massive and lucrative organized poaching ring, and those closest to him are most involved.
AFI Silver Theatre
Mon., July 29, 7 p.m.,
Thu., Aug. 1, 9:10 p.m.

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